Re: what's the story?

Ben Ginter (bginter@abilnet.com)
Fri, 11 Apr 1997 15:14:59 -0700


The question isn't whether we'll find the key, it's when. I don't want to
be at this for years but there's money at stake and that breeds competition
in our society. While any group could find it, I think DESCHALL has the
best chances based on the stats I've been watching. Even if I don't find
the key, I am rooting for the DESCHALL group to find it. I think we have
the best chances based on what I've seen. I think newcomers will see that
as well and will "jump on the bandwagon" so to say. I know I have.

While certainly nowhere near RPI's stats, I'm happy to say that I went
through over 108 billion keys yesterday, up from the previous day's 49
billion. I think I can add at least 73 billion more keys/day (got a dual
ppro200 ready to go online).. and if we can figure out how to get both
processors to work at the same time (under NT), I think I can boost that up
to over 250billion keys/day. That'd put me at 18th place! :)
I've been kind of waiting to see a linux bootdisk appear but I'm going to
make my own, I think. That should push my numbers up even more. I'd just
be happy doing more than calpoly.edu and mit.edu.. >:]

The scary thing is, what happens when we do find it and no one cares and
DES is still used? That just means we'll perfect the process of
brute-force'ing it and will make it easier for deviants to accomplish it.
(Did I say deviant?)

Anyway, my two cents..
Ben

----
From: Bill Moller <mollew@rpi.edu>
To: 'Ben Ginter' <bginter@abilnet.com>; deschall@gatekeeper.megasoft.com
Date: Friday, April 11, 1997 9:26 AM
Subject: RE: what's the story?

But, in this case, competition is bad. If every year another DES brute
force group comes out, and people keep switching, we'll never find the
key?
~Bill

-----Original Message-----
From: Ben Ginter [SMTP:bginter@abilnet.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 10, 1997 7:58 PM
To: deschall@gatekeeper.megasoft.com; Bill Moller
Subject: Re: what's the story?
[...]
Anyway, what if everyone followed the boat on everything? Others may
approach it differently and show that brute force isn't the only way.
Still others may disagree with the way keys are being doled or whatever.
COMPETITION IS GOOD! That makes it a race to the finish, IMHO. And while
we're trying to prove a point, we're also learning and adapting to make
the
process more efficient. The more angles this scrutiny and competition
occurs at, the better we can attack the ITAR, which is our main goal
anyway!