Re: Question: Timed out blocks:

andrew meggs (insect@antennahead.com)
Thu, 15 May 1997 13:04:31 -0400 (EDT)


On Thu, 15 May 1997, Dakidd wrote:
> >
> >As a temporary fix, I recommend getting a little program called
> >"Mac TCP Watcher" from info-mac and setting it to continuously ping
> >www.microsoft.com so your dialup connection appears to be active.
>
> Point the first:
> MacTCP Watcher is a great program ... *IF* you're running MacTCP. Under
> Open Transport, I've found that launching it is one of the quickest ways
> known to man to find yourself looking at the MacsBug screen or a bomb box.
> When I was still running MacTCP, I found that it was an OUTSTANDING piece
> of software.

Note that I said "Mac TCP Watcher", not "MacTCP Watcher". The extra space
makes it a newer version that watches TCP streams on Macs rather than
watching MacTCP.

In any case, everyone with a Mac should get the new optimized client,
since it's faster and friendlier, even though it doesn't do anything
intelligent about PPP.

> Point the second:
> I like NOT having to pay commercial rates for my ISP, thanks...

Here in Richmond "commercial rates" are $9.50/month for unlimited use, but
if you can't swing it, you can't swing it. Now that I think about it,
opening PPP by opening a socket is a pretty lame idea, because A) the call
to create the socket is going to block while dialing and negotiating,
which isn't an effective use of CPU cycles, and B) it's just going to stay
open until an idle timeout at your ISP closes it, and if you've got a 30
minute or 1 hour timeout the open will be right on the heels of a close,
if it gets closed at all. Anyone know how the PPP control panel works it
asynchronously?

> Speaking of screen shots... I keep seeing mention of log files and the like
> from the non-Mac users. Is that ever going to be an option for us Mac
> folks? Aside from a screen-shot, I can't figure out any other way to pass
> along dropped results to the server.

During testing I developed an advanced loggin system using a pencil and
paper. :)

A found key will cause your Mac to beep incessantly and display a message
like:

Processor (n) -- key found after nnnnnnn iterations.

Copy down the number of iterations and the key that that processor had
started from, and mail or telephone Rocke. He presumably has a way to
test such an occurrence independently of the client report.